Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

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Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Sun Jul 08, 2018 10:22 pm

Posting this a few hours early.

It is likely that wizarding writing systems followed a similar development pattern to that of Muggle writing systems. It is possible, however, that wizards had a different underlying purpose for their earliest writing systems. Perhaps they represented spells, magical creatures or wizarding tools, or perhaps wizards too needed to keep records of some sort.

For 10 points, design at least 5 wizarding specific pictograms and suggest meanings for them. What role did these pictograms play in ancient wizarding society? What tools would ancient wizards have used to create these pictograms? Would magic have been used in the process?

Upload your pictograms to an image-hosting site and send the link along with your explanation to hol.bookclub @ gmail.com (without the spaces) with the subject line 'Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms - HOL ID' by 15 July. Remember to include your HOL Name, ID and House in the body of the email.

We'll be sharing people's submissions in this thread after the deadline: if you'd rather yours wasn't posted, just let us know.
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"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Re: Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Sun Jul 08, 2018 10:36 pm

Submissions have been received from:

Amaryllis Storm
Arianna Stonewater
Aurelia West
Gail Allen
Kendra Givens
Maxim Trevelyan
Polaris Black
Prof. Gustavo Flores
Silas Hipolito Crist
Will Lestrange
Zach Jameson
Image

"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Posts: 1480
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2003 6:05 pm
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Re: Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:12 am

Submission by Amaryllis Storm:

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My Pictograph is a simple map for a Potion Master or a Novice. Magic would have been used to carve the outline and different colored pigments would have been mixed to fill in the outlines. Magic would have been used to bind the pigment to the rock and make it last.

The pictograph explains that on the night of a red crescent moon, you are to travel towards the mountains where a blue comet will appear. IN the woods on the mountain, you will find the rear white flower of fertility which grows only when the blue comet appears.
Image

"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Posts: 1480
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2003 6:05 pm
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Re: Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:13 am

Submission by Arianna Stonewater:

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I think wizards would use pictograms to keep track of potion ingredients! A picture is certainly faster to read than long words like "lacewing flies" and "boomslang skin" and I think they would have kept track of them by scorching marks on whatever happened to be handy with a bit of charcoal or by using their wand.
Image

"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Re: Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:14 am

Submission by Aurelia West:

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I designed 5 pictograms. The first one is a circle with 6 lines protruding from its top and right side. The order goes, long line, short line, long, long, short, long. This represents divination and what I believe looking into the future would best be pictured. The second one is two lines crossed line an x but the tops of both lines stems branches into two. I've deemed this to mean wand, and I like to think that it represents both the spells that wands emit (hence the line branching), but also the dangers wands pose to each other if magic is not used wisely, hence them crossing like a do not enter sign. The third pictogram I designed is best described as a capital E lying on its side so that all three legs point downwards, the middle line significantly shorter than the other two. This represents the killing curse. Now while we don't know nearly all there is to know about wizarding history, I'm sure many battles have emerged before written word became what we recognize today, and that unfortunately a good many people were subjected to the killing curse. The three legs of the symbol represent the curse itself, while its structure kind of reminds me of an upsidedown horseshoe which I personally associate with bad luck. The fourth pictogram I submitted represents gold, something I'm also sure had a strong place in society before it became the galleons we know today. It is best described as a box with three arrows that point inwards breaking up the continuity of the structure, one each at the top two corners and a third from the middle of the bottom. This can either mean that something within the 'box' holds value, or I also like to think of it as a symbol that may have been found outside of places meaning that wealth may be found inside and the arrows represent the longing to obtain wealth. My final pictogram represents battle and the losses that emerge from it on either side. It is four vertical lines, but while the three on the left have a top stroke extending to the right in a continuous incline, the fourth line instead has a stroke at the bottom of it extending downwards.

Overall I tried to think of pictograms that would match the history we do know of and how that intertwines with Muggle history to create the society we know today. I think that anything would do for creating such pictograms, but I like to imagine carving them into various places via magic similar to the way Harry did in the Deathly Hallows on Dobby's tombstone.
Image

"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Re: Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:17 am

Submission by Gail Allen:

The pictograms I've designed mean: Magic in general, Cauldron, Potion, Incendio, and Quidditch.

They didn't play a particular role, but simply represented these things to the reader. Incendio is a bit special though as that was not just a representation of the spell, but also an instruction on how to work it in the first place as long as one knew the incantation to go with it. They of course used wands, but for colour natural dyes were used. So yes, magic was absolutely part of the process in the moving ones and often also in those that didn't move.

Magic:
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Cauldron:
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Potion:
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Incendio:
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Quidditch:
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"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Re: Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:18 am

Submission by Kendra Givens:

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The first symbol is a little burst of light, almost appearing like a sun. This symbol represents “lumos”, and indicates to anyone that there is reason to use the spell while in that area. It might be that there is something hidden that needs to be revealed or that there needs to be light in order to continue on that path. Next is a rough symbol of a dragon, put in areas where someone has seen a dragon in order to indicate potential danger (or perhaps fun?) for other wizards nearby. Third is two wavy blue lines stacked on top of another to indicate the spell “aguamenti”, which is used to indicate the need to generate water either for safe passage through a dry area or because the water in the area is unsafe to drink. Fourth is a fun one, just a symbol of a broom and some tally marks to indicate how many Quidditch matches have been played on the nearby field area. Last is a (very rough) symbol of a badger (sorry, badgers…), which represents that, for a particular group of wizards, house affiliations are all marked on the burial sites of the deceased for remembrance. Some marks, like the tallies, could be erased and edited by any wizard. Others could only be erased by the wizard who made them. Color is significant in a lot of them, such as the yellow for light or blue for water, but not necessary to understand the significance of the symbol.
Image

"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Re: Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:19 am

Submission by Polaris Black:

Image

These pictograms were used to identify locations of goods or services in ancient wizarding society. A wand (and magic) would have been used to carve the image in the nearby bark of a tree or stone.

Patronus – look for this pictogram if you need a shaman to interact with the spirit world for the purposes of divination or healing.

Pest – look for this pictogram if you need an exterminator to rid your dwelling of troublesome infestations.

Pitch – look for this pictogram if you took a wrong turn on you way to the Quidditch stadium.

Portus – look for this pictogram if you are meeting up with a group to be transported to a pre-specified location.

Post – look for this pictogram if you need to send somebody a message or a package.

Potion – look for this pictogram if you need an apothecary for something to cure whatever may ail you.
Image

"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Re: Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:21 am

Submission by Prof. Gustavo Flores:

The meaning of each pictogram is on the image. The logic I believed this Ancient Wizarding Culture used to define those pictograms is the following:

* Pain: Meant to represent a blood stain. Much of the pain this society felt was due to war wounds, so there’s the relation with blood.

* Hunger: An empty feeling (pretty much like an empty stomach).

* Defensive spell: Represents a shield while the yellow mark represents the attack

* Levitation: An unexplained force (the black lines), pushing something (blue line) up.

* Danger: They needed a big pictogram for this, in order to catch the attention of the “reader” and get help. The more borders the pictogram had, bigger the danger was.

Oddly enough, I don’t think they used magic to paint their pictograms. I believe that back then, magic only was used to protect and defend themselves. They used their hands and branches to paint their pictograms.

Image
Image

"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Re: Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:23 am

Submission by Silas Hipolito Crist:

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First symbol is magic wand with two hearts at each end of the stick. This is a symbol of love and it was very regulary used because of very simple way to draw it.

Next symbol are small circles which are representing every type of water, they can mean sea or even ordinary water in a glass.

Then is the skull, which is quite obvious. It represents death and danger. In old age people were feared of this symbol.

Next symbol is magic wand like it is drawn in muggle stories. Once wands were different from the newer ones and it was the symbol of magic. This wand has the star on the top and represents the source of magic.

The last symbol are simple stars, which are used for magic. Once they believed that magic comes from the stars and this symbol originates from this fact.
Image

"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale

User avatar
Prof. Amy Lupin
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Posts: 1480
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2003 6:05 pm
Location: Slytherin

Re: Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:25 am

Submission by Will Lestrange:

Image

The five pictograms I made all have specific meanings for primitive wizards.

The first symbol, a vertical line, represents the stick that is used as a conduit for magic. (Essentially, these sticks are precursors to staves and wands - and used much the same way). This symbol is the base for most of the other pictograms I depicted.

The second symbol, a vertical line topped with a circle, represents light. The meaning of this shape comes from the way wizards would create light: by making the end of their stick light up.

The third symbol, a vertical line topped with a triangle, represents fire. Once again, the meaning of the shape comes from the way wizards would create fire: through their stick (which they could then pass along to other objects).

The fourth symbol, a pentagram topped with a vertical line, represents a person with magic. The symbolism is as follows: the mysticism of a pentagram represents the magical person and the vertical line, of course, represents the magical stick they hold.

The last symbol, a square, represents a person without the capacity for magic. The squareness of the shape suggests that the person does not have any magical energy - and this is the only symbol that does not contain a stick, representing that such a person cannot make use of any magical objects.

These pictograms would likely be used to convey messages (e.g. if you saw four of the fourth symbol and three of the fifth symbol somewhere, it would mean 'here there are four magical people and three Muggles' in modern language). Most likely they would be made by people magically carving the shapes into wood: by holding their stick over the wood, moving the stick over the wood in the shape of the lines they want to make, and thinking of the shape being etched into the wood. (This is why most of the shapes are made out of straight lines: they are easier to make in this format.)
Image

"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale

User avatar
Prof. Amy Lupin
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Posts: 1480
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2003 6:05 pm
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Re: Week 2 - Wizarding Pictograms

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Jul 16, 2018 10:26 am

Submission by Zach Jameson:

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Image

"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale


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