Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:53 am

Harry Potter Book Night is an initiative by Bloomsbury to both celebrate the magic of Harry Potter as well as introduce new readers to this wondrous world. There are other initiatives out there to encourage people to read, whether more generally or relating to specific themes or works. At the Book Club, we have our seasonal reading challenges as well as Book Bingo (which we’re hoping to bring back next year).

We would like you do some research into other initiatives that help get people reading and share your findings in no fewer than 100 words. Please cite any sources used.

To earn 10 points, please send your submission to hol.bookclub @ gmail.com (with the spaces removed) with the subject "Week 3 - Reading Initiatives - HOL ID" by 18 February, 11:59 pm HOL time. Remember to include your HOL Name, ID and house in the body of the email. We will be sharing your submissions after the deadline has passed — please let us know if you do not wish us to do so.
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Prof. Tarma Amelia Black
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Re: Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:10 pm

Submissions have been received from:

Arianna Stonewater
Aurelia West
Blade J. Johnson
Gail Allen
Maxim Trevelyan
Pezzie Wolfe
Polaris Black
Professor Scarlet Leslie-Lewis
Shiloh Adlar
Will Lestrange
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Re: Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:35 pm

Arianna Stonewater submitted:

Paws to READ

My local library has a program called "Paws to READ." Once a month during the school year (and weekly during the summer) children are invited to come to the library and read to therapy dogs. This is an amazing program to help install confidence in kids' reading. The reading really cheers up the dogs, and the kids are provided with an environment to safely read out loud. After all, what dog can criticize the way a kid reads? My youngest sister participates in this and she loves reading to dogs, and she even reads out loud at school now. Her favorite thing is to use silly voices because the dogs react to that and she feels like they're really listening.
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Re: Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:36 pm

Aurelia West submitted:

My local library does a summer reading challenge each year, much like the one the book club hosts. Unlike the book club, the challenge is split into three different age groups: children, teens, and adults. There isn't a particular goal set for how many books to read and participants can log their reading in books read or minutes read. After a set amount of books or minutes read, the reader is eligible to enter a drawing for a prize. The reading challenge also usually features multiple coupons up for grabs likely to be of interest to each category. I think this is a good way to encourage reading because it also encourages people to set goals if they'd like to win any of the prizes. Another thing that I personally love to take part in are readathons. There are so many hosted online and it isn't too difficult to find one running at a time that works for you. Some are only a day long and readers can see how many books they can get through in 24 hours; others are a week long to a month long in nature. Some of them like BookTubeaThon, for which there was a topic started for this year, have giveaways and span multiple social platforms like instagram and YouTube as well. While it's unlikely to come across them unless one is already somewhat looking, they've definitely inspired me to read more and I think the enthusiasm shown by the hosts of many readathons may encourage many others to pick up books as well.
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Re: Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:37 pm

Bull J. Johnson submitted:

One initiative that my library holds each summer is a book bingo. However, this book bingo also has activities to do. The activity that I did last year was to attend a library event where we listened to a librarian read a few stories. Then we did a art project. The art project was to make a house using recycled material, like cardboard boxes from different foods. One person also used a egg carton. Sadly, I cannot do more than one class, because usually this class is reserved for little kids they only allowed me to join that day because I needed that box checked.
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Re: Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:38 pm

Gail Allen submitted:

An initiative I heard about, and really like, and would love to have in my place of work, is that places that do routine work have their employees pick a book of the month that they then buy as an audiobook on a collective account and put on a company device that then each employee gets to borrow and listen to the book on until everyone has heard it. Then afterwards they will have a lunchbreak discussion about the book. It's less demanding than the reading-groups that used to exist (and still exist in some places) because they get to listen while working so it does not take up additional time, and the discussions happen in the lunchbreak - a time they'd also otherwise just have been at work.
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Re: Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:39 pm

Pezzie Wolfe submitted:

A Read-In!

How much fun would it be to have a read in with an over night of fun, pizza, treats, friends, family and reading! Group read alongs, sliently reading, listening to an audiobook. And when it's time to go home, everyone gets a new book donated by those who attended to read and enjoy.

Support and or bring back Book Fairs to schools


I'm one that supports this and to see kids get excited about book fairs and tell friends and family. I would go and support a local school with one.

Schools and Scholastic Book Orders


I wish that those papers I used to get every few weeks to get new books would come back. Or at least something that kids and family can order books online. No digital books, the real thing. We need to pull kids away from the tablets, phones etc and get a book in their hand. Nothing beats reading a real book.
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Re: Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:41 pm

Polaris Black submitted:

These are just a few of the many initiatives in the United States that were created to help get children reading

Between the Lions is an award-winning PBS children's series and associated web site, which was designed to help young children learn to read. The literacy curriculum is aimed at children ages 4-7.

Guy’s Read is a web-based literacy program for boys founded by Jon Scieszka, whose mission is to motivate boys to become lifelong readers.

Read Across America was initially created to celebrate reading on March 2, which is Dr. Seuss's birthday. The one day event is now a nationwide initiative that promotes reading every day.

United Through Reading affords deployed parents the opportunity to video-record themselves reading storybooks to their children in the hope of easing the difficulty of separation while at the same time cultivating a love of reading.

The Verizon Foundation combines mobile technology, award-winning free digital content, and teacher training for schools and organizations.
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Re: Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:42 pm

Professor Scarlet Leslie-Lewis submitted:

With so many great books available, choosing the next book to read can be an overwhelming experience. Even though we are warned not to, people often judge books by their covers. But what happens when the cover is taken out of the picture?

This was the main idea behind Blind Date with a Book. Each book is wrapped in brown paper with some keywords, like genre and overall theme, written on the front of the novel. Blind Date books are a great way to introduce people to books they might not actively choose on their own. They are also popular as gifts.

Blind Date with a Book was introduced by an employee of the Elizabeth's Bookshop branches in Australia. It is now possible to purchase Blind Date books online as well. Many bookstores and libraries around the world have emulated this idea. I first saw a Blind Date with a Book set-up in the Young Adult section at my local library for Valentine's Day four years ago.
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Re: Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:44 pm

Shiloh Adlar submitted:

The library where I live has summer camps for children. These are reading camps that have a lot of fun and games, but they also have storytellers to help bring the stories to life. As a group, the children will read a book together and then they will sometimes put on a play of the book or participate in games that connect to the book. If the book has some sort of scavenger hunt, then they would send the children on a scavenger hunt. This makes reading very exciting for kids since it brings the book to life. They are also reading with and making new friends, so it can give excellent memories connected to reading.
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Re: Week 3 - Reading Initiatives

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:44 pm

Will Lestrange submitted:

(NOTE: The below is obviously out of character.)

The most memorable reading initiative I remember from my childhood was the "Book It!" program from a fast-food restaurant known as "Pizza Hut". As I remember the program in my elementary school, each month from October through March you participated by reading a book outside of schoolwork and proving - in some way - that you had read the book to your teacher. (In my school that was usually done by giving a brief oral summary and answering a follow-up question or two, though other schools may have asked for written reports instead. While written reports may *sound* harder, the oral report version makes it easier for the teacher to ensure that you did the work yourself.) Once you demonstrated that you had read the book to your teacher's satisfaction, you would receive a coupon that you could take to any Pizza Hut restaurant for a free "personal pan pizza"! Even though Pizza Hut is far from the world's best pizza, it's the type of thing that serves as a real reward for kids in the target age range of "Book It!" and the fact that the food was earned by the reading makes it that much more of a compelling reward. According to my research, the program still exists today - a quarter century or so after my own participation!
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