Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Amy Lupin » Mon Jan 29, 2018 7:54 am

Reading is such a big part of my life — I imagine it to be the same for most of you as well — and yet I find I often take it for granted.

For some, reading can be an enormous challenge. We see this in Fish in a Tree (our upcoming book discussion) with Ally, who has dyslexia, a reading disorder. A number of chronic illnesses, such as fibromyalgia make it difficult to concentrate. These and other obstacles to reading can affect people of all ages and backgrounds.

In order to get a better understanding of these obstacles, we would like you to do some research and discuss one of the many obstacles to reading in detail. We would also like you to explore ways in which people can find ways around these obstacles so as to still experience the joys of reading. Your write-up should be at least 100 words.

To earn 10 points, please send your submission to hol.bookclub @ gmail.com (with the spaces removed) with the subject "Week 1 - Obstacles - HOL ID" by 4 February, 11:59 pm HOL time. We will be sharing your submissions after the deadline has passed — please let us know if you do not wish us to do so.
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"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale
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Prof. Amy Lupin
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Re: Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Amy Lupin » Tue Jan 30, 2018 2:27 pm

Submissions have been received from:

Arianna Stonewater
Aurelia West
Emanuel Hines
Gail Allen
Hannah R Thomas
Kendra Givens
Maxim Trevelyan
Polaris Black
Shadow Gaunt
Vanessa Tilley
Will Lestrange
Last edited by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black on Sat Feb 03, 2018 5:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do."
- Edward Everett Hale
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Prof. Tarma Amelia Black
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Re: Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:36 pm

Arianna Stonewater submitted:

Speech Impediments often cause an obstacle to reading. When learning to read, children start with reading out loud. When they have an impediment, such as a stutter or lisp, it can make reading difficult, especially in front of their peers. Some may try to hide it by skipping over or replacing certain words, or just not read at all to avoid embarrassment. Knowing you have this issue may even cause you to have a speech impediment when you read in your head, making it even harder to enjoy reading.

For some, this is a phase they grow out of, but for many they have to work really hard to get this under control. The best course of action is practice. For some, this might mean seeing a speech therapist. They have many tips, tricks, and exercises that can help control and sometimes even get rid of an impediment. They will have you practice often, and with their help you should be reading just fine in no time!
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"You have the inborn natural right to remain silent. Don't think about it, don't talk about it, shuush ....... STILL." ~ Xaris
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Re: Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:37 pm

Aurelia West submitted:

There are many obstacles to reading, including difficulty decoding words, lack of fluency when reading aloud, and poor reading comprehension. Word decoding has to do with putting words together from sounds, fluency deals in reading aloud quickly and those with poor reading comprehension have trouble understanding what they read. Since most of these have to do with reading a physical book, audiobooks are a great resource that don't require the reader to need to put together each word from the page or piece things together quickly. My sister has ADHD which causes her to have difficulty focusing for long periods of time. While she isn't particularly partial to reading, I find that she reads most when there are books focusing on topics that really grab her interest, such as true crime, and when the chapters are short enough that she can leave and come back or there are good stopping points.
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"You have the inborn natural right to remain silent. Don't think about it, don't talk about it, shuush ....... STILL." ~ Xaris
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Re: Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:38 pm

Emanuel Hines submitted

The obstacle, which is not so serious, but can also make many troubles is limited vocabulary. Some would say that this is not any obstacle and that it is much worse to have any other reading obstacle. But having limited vocabulary can inflict all parts of human life. There will be problems in school and after this at the job- with limited vocabulary person will have problems at writing essay.

On the other side we all know how to improve it- by reading a lot of different books (also scientific, not only literature). But the catch is that often limited vocabulary is a reason of antimotivation. After meeting to many difficult terms and phrases, reading is not a reading any more- it becomes translating the phrases into words that you are similar with (translating from your language into your language).

Another problem is that limited vocabulary can inflict learning new languages- without proper words in your language, it is hard to learn a new one.

So solution is simple, but risky. Person needs to start with shorter books, so he can be motivated enough whole time by reading. After some time he/she can continue with reading longer and more difficult books.
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"You have the inborn natural right to remain silent. Don't think about it, don't talk about it, shuush ....... STILL." ~ Xaris
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Re: Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:39 pm

Gail Allen submitted:

I find that one of the most common obstacles to reading, especially for kids, is that it often requires more patience than they have been accustomed to muster. Books and reading is immensely rewarding, but it does require concentration, patience and persistence, especially when the reader is a child who has not yet managed to increase their reading pace to a point where they will find it effortless to read. I think it has always been a problem for reading that it required this amount of patience and concentration, but I think it might be even more so these days where there are so many distractions readily available from a plethora of electronics and media. These are often far more appealing to inexperienced readers because they offer instant gratification and are more easily approached.

I think a way to combat this is for parents to limit the time their children have access to electronics. Reading is an important skill, and not just for the enjoyment of literature, but to be able to function in an adult environment. Parents, and anyone older actually, can also help the child learn that there are rewards to persisting in reading a book, by simply reading to the child. This will bring the speed up and help the child realise that once you get into the book, it will be exciting and make them more likely to find the patience to stick with a book even through the less interesting, but necessarily parts where the world and characters are established and expanded upon, but where not much action might take place.
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"You have the inborn natural right to remain silent. Don't think about it, don't talk about it, shuush ....... STILL." ~ Xaris
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Re: Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:42 pm

Hannah R Thomas submitted:

To an obstacle, such as this one, I can cope with others. As a child, I have had a significant difficulty in reading. This was because of a learning disability towards “reading comprehension.” Some of the tasks that I had as a child, and that they still do today, are they pull individuals aside to help them. A task that is very common is that a specialist, or aide, will pull children aside and bring them to a secluded room, like for a quiz or exam, to help them focus. What the specialist will then do is read a passage out to the student so that they can “imagine” the passage in their head as a picture. Afterwards, the student takes the quiz or test while the adult helps them reading/understanding the question. Other research has shown that individuals use audiobooks instead of the actual book. As mentioned beforehand, the individual has better mind of visualizing the event that is occurring than reading it.
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"You have the inborn natural right to remain silent. Don't think about it, don't talk about it, shuush ....... STILL." ~ Xaris
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Re: Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:44 pm

Kendra Givens submitted:

One obstacle to reading that a lot of the students I work with face every day is ADHD. Reading, by nature, requires extended focus to get through multiple pages or chapters. People with ADHD tend to struggle with summarization and word recognition, because it can be difficult for them to remember what happened in the story a few paragraphs or pages back when they have difficulty maintaining attention for long periods of time. When reading, people with ADHD benefit from taking many notes and writing down definitions of new or difficult words so that they can keep up with what they are reading. It might also help if they read aloud themselves or have a program/person read aloud to them so that they experience the writing in multiple ways. They might benefit from reading in quiet settings to limit distractions. It might also be beneficial to them take breaks during reading more frequently, as extended periods of attention can be exhausting to them.
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"You have the inborn natural right to remain silent. Don't think about it, don't talk about it, shuush ....... STILL." ~ Xaris
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Re: Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:45 pm

Polaris Black submitted:

Double Vision

Double vision, or diplopia, occurs when a person sees a double image while looking at a single object. It may affect one eye (monocular diplopia) or both (binocular diplopia). In addition to being an obstacle to reading, double vision can also affect balance, movement, and navigating the world.

If the double vision is monocular, the problem is more likely to be within the eye and is likely to be less serious. It can be caused by cornea irregularities, lens abnormalities, insufficient tears, and retina degeneration. Depending upon the cause, treatments can include corrective lenses, surgery, and tears substitute.

If the double vision is binocular, the problem can be quite serious and should be diagnosed quickly. It can be caused by weak extra-ocular muscles, malfunctioning nerves, degenerative diseases, and brain injury. Depending upon the cause, treatments can include special eyewear like an eye patch or prism glasses, surgery, and medications.
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"You have the inborn natural right to remain silent. Don't think about it, don't talk about it, shuush ....... STILL." ~ Xaris
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Re: Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:47 pm

Shadow Gaunt submitted:

There was a very large obstacle to reading until 1824. The obstacle was blindness and in 1824 Braille was invented. In early times, blind people were regarded as less than. Blind or visually impaired babies were left to die, and adult people were not treated well and were not regarded as much of value. However, in the Middle Ages cilvilizations, particularly in Europe, started to feel like it was society’s obligation to care for the ‘less fortunate” such as blind people. Houses were built to take care of the blind and visually impaired.

In 1784 the first blind School was established in France. In 1824 Braille was invented by Louis Braille. After that more and more schools and institutions for the blind opened up and printing presses to make books for the blind also opened up. In 1918 Braille was declared as the standard tactile reading and writing system in the US. Soon, blind people became integrated into the workforce and laws were passed to protect their rights. By the 21st century blind and visually impaired people were almost integrated into society.

Blindness was an obstacle to reading non-Braille books since there was absolutely no way blind people could read them. Kids and adults couldn’t enjoy reading. However, with the invention and spread of the Braille system blind and visually impaired people could finally enjoy reading and writing books.
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Re: Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:49 pm

Vanessa Tilley submitted:

As some of you know, I am actually bipolar. This condition causes a big obstacle for me when it comes to reading because I have a lack of focus that I have a hard time getting around.

Being bipolar, my mind never slows down. It tends to run 100 miles a minute and thoughts constantly plague my brain. When I pick up a book, I may get through 1-5 chapters, depending on how long the chapters are, and then I will start to fidget. My legs or fingers have to be moving because they can't stand sitting sit.

To overcome the lack of focus as much as possible, I have found that I need something else in the background to keep part of my mind distracted while I read. Watching TV sometimes works but then I get caught up in what is happening sometimes. I recently found the Pandora radio application and have now started to get a bit better on focus. I am able to turn on this instrumental music that has a nice calming effect and is able to distract my mind.

Keeping my mind distracted has done wonders for my reading. I also started a schedule and at 2 pm EST every day, I go into the bedroom and sit down on my waterbed to read. The waterbed moves when I do so I don't have issues with fidgeting. I can just roll over or move to a different position and I seem to do doing better. I have already read 5 books this month alone which is a record for me.
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"You have the inborn natural right to remain silent. Don't think about it, don't talk about it, shuush ....... STILL." ~ Xaris
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Re: Week 1 - Obstacles to Reading

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Tue Feb 06, 2018 6:50 pm

Will Lestrange submitted:

One of the biggest obstacles to reading is peer pressure. I'm sure many of us have found a time when there was some book or story that we really wanted to read, but - for whatever reason - the people around us disapproved of our choice. Maybe it wasn't "intellectual" enough; maybe it was too "geeky" and not "mainstream" enough... or maybe the message it conveyed was not in line with the mainstream beliefs of our peer group.

The best way to get around this obstacle is to realize that we should not let our tastes be dictated by what other people think they should be. And in a society where it's dangerous (socially or otherwise) to be seen reading certain books, one can always do what generations have done before us and hide the books under our pillows to read at night!
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"You have the inborn natural right to remain silent. Don't think about it, don't talk about it, shuush ....... STILL." ~ Xaris
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