The Fellowship of the Ring: Book Two, Chapter I — Chapter V

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Prof. Tarma Amelia Black
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The Fellowship of the Ring: Book Two, Chapter I — Chapter V

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Sun Oct 01, 2017 2:58 am

Now we are discussing Book Two, Chapter I: Many MeetingsChapter V: The Bridge of Khazad-dum. If you have read the book before, did you remember that Mr. Tolkien had divided it up into Book 1 and Book 2? I had completely forgotten that!

What did you read in here with which you were surprised? If you have read it before, did you come across any favorite parts and linger there? Was there a particular detail or description that stuck with you? Let us know!

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Image is of the Fellowship, as they are first shown at Rivendell. Strider, Gandalf, Legolas, Boromir, in the back row and Sam, Frodo, Merry, Pippin and Gimli in the front row.

Remember to include spoiler tags, though, as not everyone might have read as far as you have.
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*Avatar & Siggy by Cheeky XVIx!Cosmo* ... image by Susan Seddon Boulet
"You have the inborn natural right to remain silent. Don't think about it, don't talk about it, shuush ....... STILL." ~ Xaris
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Prof. Tarma Amelia Black
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Re: The Fellowship of the Ring: Book Two, Chapter I — Chapter V

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Thu Oct 26, 2017 6:24 am

I'm not deliberately avoiding posting this -- no, not at all.

This whole section is so great; we meet everyone in Rivendell, the Fellowship is formed, and the Bridge of Khazad-dum ... :( .

Anyway, here the second book starts with Frodo waking up in a very strange, yet wonderful, place. As the chapter title says, it is a time of many meetings. People being reunited with friends, and all kinds of strangers coming in and meeting each other. Somehow, though, even with such diversity of peoples (dwarf, elf, hobbit and more) who have a lot of 'history' between them, no one kills or damages anyone else. The backstory of the Ring comes out ... is this scary or what. (Yes, it is. Tolkien is a superb story-teller!) Then, the nine are chosen. Some of them have to be and other choices just 'happen'.

Note: I love how Bilbo says he'll do it, and how the others look on him with "grave respect". That didn't get into the movie, but other lines did, even if moved from one place to another. Bilbo gives Sting to Frodo ... and his dwarf-mail

Then the Fellowship leaves Rivendell, on a perilous (and perhaps hopeless) journey. The land they travel is described so well, I can feel it, and all the walking. The feeling of 'being watched' is also described very well. There is something of evil watching them.

Oh, this is a difficult part of the book to write about! And there they go to the mountain, but no, they cannot make it through the pass. It's either keep on, or go back to Rivendell ... So, they do as Gimli wants, and go to the Mines of Moria. And there is a long and difficult journey there, to go under the mountains. And Gandalf, to the Balrog "You cannot pass!" And ... the Balrog doesn't pass.
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*Avatar & Siggy by Cheeky XVIx!Cosmo* ... image by Susan Seddon Boulet
"You have the inborn natural right to remain silent. Don't think about it, don't talk about it, shuush ....... STILL." ~ Xaris
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Prof. Gustavo Flores
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Re: The Fellowship of the Ring: Book Two, Chapter I — Chapter V

Post by Prof. Gustavo Flores » Mon Oct 30, 2017 5:58 am

I certainly didn’t remember that the story was divided in two books. But I think this second book was greater than the first one! The fellowship is finally formed and a new set of adventures awit our heroes!

In the movies, I love Arwen. It doesn’t have much participation in this book, but I got excited when she finally appeared, so subtle, looking beautiful and mysterious.Also, regarding the movie (and answering to Tarma’s question), one of the things that has always been stuck on my head is that crazy, mad look that Bilbo gets when Frodo shows him the Ring again. I didn’t remember that the book described so very well as well! Son when I read it, I instantly thought about the movie.

When the Fellowship was finally formed, we get to learn a lot of back story of the Ring, which I think was very interesting. I didn’t remember of the tricks made by Sauron, for example, trying to convince the Goblins to join him, and trying to make them look for the Ring a certain Hobbit had stolen.

Then, we know that with great bravery,Frodo accepts his destiny and the new journey he has to make. Still, as much as it was a personal decision, I keep thinking it wasn’t completely fair. Frodo was not guilty of anything, the Ring was just a gift he received, so I feel sad and not fair that he had to carry all that weight on his shoulders just for a gift. It seems like a really cruel and bad joke from destiny!

I also liked that this journey is like the time of the Hobbits to “shine”, to make a name for themselves.The others perceive it that way, and the Hobbits are excited about that idea.I like that it is a way to show us that we re never too small to achieve things and that everyone deserves an opportunity.

Like I said in the beginning, ths second book was very interesting. We get to read about the first journey of the characters as the Fellowship o the Ring, and their new adventures and dangers to overcome. I specially liked the part of the hidden door (the one Gandalf managed to open, and that appeared on the rocks) and all the adventures inside.

Of course, of great impact is the unfortunate event that happened on the bridge. I know the fate of the character, but if Gandalf had actually died, I would have been extremely mad. Such a waste to get rid o him early in the story when he is a great character! But, things get better! This reminded me about one Wand-Making assignment in which we discussed when a wizards intentionally breaks his wand and staff, and Gandalf is the perfect example for that. The best part are his motives, he broke it to save his friends, so he represents bravery and sacrifice, something that is worth to mention and remember.

I’m almost done with the book! My final insights coming soon!
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