Getting to Know You

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Prof. Tarma Amelia Black
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Getting to Know You

Post by Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Sun Feb 25, 2018 5:19 am

If you wanted someone to get to know you better, which book would you recommend they read?

Have you read a book and said 'that's me' or 'this explains me'.

Which book is this? Who is the author?

Why would you recommend someone to read the book in order to learn about you? Is it because of a character, or characters, in the story? Or is it the story itself? Is it a history book or a fantasy or a science fiction or what?

Do you like this book?

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Maxim Trevelyan
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Re: Getting to Know You

Post by Maxim Trevelyan » Sun May 13, 2018 12:28 pm

I think that whoever wanted to know me a little better should read Bridge to Terabithia by the very talented Katherine Paterson. Why this book though? Mostly due to the story rather than characters themselves. It parallels perhaps the most important relationship I ever had in my life and its tragic end. When I read the aftermath of Leslie’s death and feelings surrounding it, I remembered my own experiences and emotions just exploded out of me. You will certainly need a tissue on hand if you read this book.

It is certainly a sad, but beautiful story that deals with heavy themes, but presents them quite well in my opinion.
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Shiloh Adlar
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Re: Getting to Know You

Post by Shiloh Adlar » Fri Aug 03, 2018 1:02 am

In order to understand my love for science, one should read The Disappearing Spoon by Sam Kean. I am in awe with this book which is a non-fictional account of all the elements on the periodic table and their history. There are fascinating stories that are told, some I had heard and others that were completely new to me because there is rarely time in the classroom or textbooks to discuss such things. However, these stories truly brought the elements to life, almost humanizing them.

There are scientists that I had never heard of for good and horrid reasons, backgrounds that were never properly shared, and even information on some advanced study work that I would be interested in researching some day for fun.
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Shiloh Adlar
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Re: Getting to Know You

Post by Shiloh Adlar » Tue Aug 21, 2018 4:41 am

As a follow up to my above post, I also read The Violinist's Thumb by Sam Kean. Perhaps this is an even better book to understand more about me. As the last one focused on the periodic table of elements, this one focuses on genetics and specifically our DNA. Once again, Kean goes through explaining how genetics works and of course the thing we all probably know as genetic code. In story form, he goes on to discuss how DNA was found and about all of the scientists, even those we do not hear of today, had a part in discovering this code or perhaps discovered it accidentally and didn't even realize it.

The history is still astounding to me, especially the fruit fly experiment told in this form rather than just saying, "This is what happened when they did this." No, there's a whole background to the experiment that is never told in class or in science books simply because there isn't enough time or it isn't required to understand the subject at hand. But then again, in a way, it is. This information when applied to scientific study is very useful for researchers because now we know the stories of other researchers and how it's possible to stumble upon something and never realize it until much later or that calling a press conference too soon could literally be the end of one's career.

Kean has a selection of other books, one on neuroscience, that I plan to read later this year. I have been very impressed with his books (and of course getting to communicate with the author directly through social media was ONE of the highlights of this month).
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Shiloh Adlar, Seventh Year, Prefect, RQT Co-Captain
"Let us read, and let us dance; these two amusements will never do any harm to the world." -Voltaire
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