Book Review: A Wrinkle in Time

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Shiloh Adlar
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Book Review: A Wrinkle in Time

Postby Shiloh Adlar » Sat May 19, 2018 1:39 pm

Title of the book: A Wrinkle in Time
Authors: Madeline L'Engle
Series: Time Quintet
Genres: Science Fiction, Children's Classics

Short summary of the story: Meg along with her younger brother, Charles Wallace, and Calvin, an older boy from her school, are transported through time by the three W's in order to find Charles Wallace and Meg's father and defeat the evil trying to take over their world.

Good points / bad points: It had been so long since I read this book, and I had forgotten so much. After reading When You Reach Me and the fact that the movie just came out, I knew I needed to read it again. I'm still in love with it today. Though as an adult, I have been able to see much bigger themes in this book besides love defeats all. This book also focuses on important matters of the time in which is was written such as totalitarian/communist society. This is scene in depth when they reach Camaztoz and everyone deos everything alike in unison. If one thing is out of place, they have to go through re-programming or such. Also, the mix of hard science along with religious elements were quite mind blowing and this caused debate and criticism from both sides of the spectrum then there are those that could appreciate the ties between science and religion or even simply the morals L'Engle wanted to showcase in this wonderful tale. I also absolutely Charles Wallace and the symbolism I've found in his character. He's only five years old but he's the smartest out of all of them. He still has this childlike belief and is able to transcend knowledge by using means of communication outside of verbal speaking. He's able to feel what people and things are rather than relying simply on what he sees or hears, much like the three W's. He can speak telepathically and even read minds of a sort. Whereas Meg, being older, has none of this. She is so focused on other things while Charles Wallace has accepted who he is. I wonder if this means that if we focus more inwardly, if new abilities open up to us. But this is only speculation on my part.

There weren't any significant bad points in this book, although, as an adult, I found that it jumped around a lot and I had to pay careful attention for my brain to know what was going on at times which is strange because as a child, I don't remember needing to do this when my brother read it to me.
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Shiloh Adlar, Sixth Year, Prefect, RQT Co-Captain
"Let us read, and let us dance; these two amusements will never do any harm to the world." -Voltaire

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