The Hunger Games: Chapters 1-6

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Prof. Amy Lupin
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The Hunger Games: Chapters 1-6

Postby Prof. Amy Lupin » Wed Mar 01, 2017 6:12 am

Ladies and gentlemen, let the Seventy fourth Hunger Games begin!


Oh wait… we’re not quite there yet… In this thread, we’ll be discussing chapters 1-6 of The Hunger Games.

We'll be including a short prompt in every post to get you thinking but you are more than welcome to ignore or adapt them if you've got your own thoughts to share. We'd love to hear absolutely anything that occurs to you while reading (however small) just so long as it's HOL-appropriate.

To begin with, what do you think of the story set-up and the characters that have been introduced so far?

Please remember to include spoiler tags when discussing specifics.
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Prof. Tarma Amelia Black
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Re: The Hunger Games: Chapters 1-6

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Wed Mar 01, 2017 8:14 pm

I was watching the 'makings' of the movie The Hunger Games and many of the actors interviewed said they had read the book and wanted to be IN the movie -- one wanted it before there was even a movie thought of.

Why is this? I wondered. So I re-read the book. Yes, I'm re-reading it again. It is that good. No spoilers with this post but when I read Amy's post above, that is the first thing that occurred to me -- that so many people who ended up acting in the movie actively sought it out to BE in the movie, because they'd read the book.

Of those interviewed, I remember most two people in particular who were vehement about the book and the movie. The persons who plays Effie Trinket (Elizabeth Banks) and President Coriolanus Snow (Donald Sutherland) both were passionate about the book and the movie. I think they both did wonderfully in portraying their characters.

And I hope that, if you read the book, you will enjoy it.
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Arianna Stonewater
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Re: The Hunger Games: Chapters 1-6

Postby Arianna Stonewater » Thu Mar 02, 2017 3:13 pm

Prof. Tarma Amelia Black wrote:Of those interviewed, I remember most two people in particular who were vehement about the book and the movie. The persons who plays Effie Trinket (Elizabeth Banks) and President Coriolanus Snow (Donald Sutherland) both were passionate about the book and the movie. I think they both did wonderfully in portraying their characters.


1. I LOVE LOVE LOVE LOVE Elizabeth Banks. She is amazing, and did amazing in the movie, and was pretty close to the person i imagined wild reading.

2. Donald Sutherland also did great! There were choices made that I wouldn't have picked, but its my understanding that most of those were directing choices and not his.

ANYWHO, back to the book!

This is probably the only series that, like Harry Potter, I read as they were coming out, rather than waiting for several of them to be out and see how the reviews are. My aunt gave me a copy of the first book for Christmas my sophomore year of college. I actually really liked it, and have reread it before each book (and subsequent movie) came out.

My first thought while re-reading this, was why is Katniss doing the hunting? Once again, here is another YA book where the family is run by the teen because the adult is inept, and the same is true of her best friend Gale. Why does this appeal to us so?

Reading how the reaping is described reminds me of a lot of low-income family systems. "You can have more if you go into more debt," or in this case have more chances to be chosen. I wonder why the ages were set 12-18? surely over 18 could still be acceptable, but 12 is very young to have to fight for your life.

I wonder what the other District 12 champion was like?

I thought it was interesting that District 12 is what used to be Appalachia; that's not far from where i grew up! When I was home for spring break after finishing this book i drove around with my younger sister and speculated about the various areas and what it would be like in the post-rebellion world of District 12.

I loved the description of the Justice Building, it really brought up the contrast between the rich and the poor in District 12, which makes the contrast between 12 and the Capital later that much more terrible.
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Prof. Tarma Amelia Black
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Re: The Hunger Games: Chapters 1-6

Postby Prof. Tarma Amelia Black » Fri Mar 03, 2017 10:45 pm

One of the first things I notice reading The Hunger Games is the style in which it is written.

Here is a person writing of her experiences as she experiences them. It's immediate, it has impact of how this person is and what she is thinking and feeling at a depth that doesn't usually happen in books that are written third person and 'how it was'.
When I wake up, the other side of the bed is cold.

How different that is from "When I woke up, the other side of the bed was cold." or even "When she woke up, the other side of the bed was cold."

This is a very brave way to start out a book. The success of the story will largely depend on whether we like being in that person's mind and skin or not. Whether we want the immediacy of this is happening and it's happening right now.

Addressing a comment of Arianna's - about inept adults - Well, so often that is how it is. In my own life experiences, I've encountered many many teenagers (or younger) who did what is needed around the house (or outside the house and home) because of inept adults. It's sort of cheerful, in a way, to find out that one is not the only person who is responsible for stuff which one would think isn't necessary because the adults in the household are ... supposedly grown up and responsible! Sort of, if they can do it, so can I. It's good, it's okay.

As for the book -- I fell into it (again). Do I like how the future is plotted out, according to the book? No. Can I see it as a possibility; as something which might actually happen? Well, yes. I study history and this is rather remarkably similar to scenarios which have happened on a semi-regular basis for all of the written history of which I am aware.

As for the story -- and now we get into the discussion of The Hunger Games. Wow. It's immediate, it is now, it is appalling and it's a heck of a story. No details now, that's for a later post.
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Re: The Hunger Games: Chapters 1-6

Postby Sky Alton » Sat Mar 04, 2017 9:58 am

I'm so glad you brought up the first person, present tense, Tarma! I'm going to be writing an academic essay on it and why authors choose to use it and I'll be using THG as an example (so I'm glad someone else thought it was significant). I think it's a bold choice because it means you have to balance claustrophobia with immediacy: being trapped in one characters head and current experience deepens your empathy for them and makes the book more dynamic and exciting but it can also be restrictive due to the lack of information it allows. I won't go into anymore of my thesis because it's starting to get boring already but yeah...awesome point.

I always struggled with the portrayal of Katniss's mother. While I think it's great to show the impact of grief on someone's mental capability, I never felt like the book treated her with any respect as a person. She isn't even named. Even with the book being very much from Katniss's emotional point of view (and carrying with it her scorn and hurt about her mother's emotional distance), I felt Mrs. Everdeen could have been fleshed out more somehow (which in turn might have given us a more neuenced understanding of Katniss and Prim's relationship). As it is, she's like a paper doll.

More later but I'm with everyone else so far-this is still an amazing and disconcerting read even on the tenth go round.
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